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Let's Do It Again, Canada!

In 2020, tens of thousands of Canadians rallied around locally owned small businesses and generated:

On a single day!

While the initial pain of COVID is hopefully behind us, the economic challenges it left behind are real! So we’re bringing The Big Spend back in 2023 with a plan for an even bigger impact.

Big Spend Friends

the big idea

Local small businesses make our communities run. They support community events and sponsor sports teams. They also provide nearly 70% of all private sector jobs in Canada.
We want to support them in the same way they have supported our communities time and again.

The next Big Spend happens April 27-30, 2023.

the Big PLan:

We’re looking for hundreds of Community Partners (Chambers of Commerce, BIA’s, and other Community Groups across Canada to help us support & promote locally owned businesses in their community and region. 

Click below to connect with us for more information on how you can be a part of The Big Spend in a big way!

Action plan

3 steps to be part of the big spend

1. Buy local

On July 25, make an intentional purchase at a local small business of your choice.

2. report your spend

Add your name to our Big Spend list, so we can map spending across Canada and track the economic impact we're making together.

3. Share the news

Share a story or photo about where you made your Big Spend on Facebook or Instagram! Use hashtag #TheBigSpend or @TheBigSpend

Big Spend List

Be part of injecting $100 million in the Canadian economy.  Report your Big Spend in the form below!

Your email isn’t needed, so don’t worry about spam!

the big spend tracker
Goal Progress
38%
spend Friends
291
Small Businesses
37
Faith Organizations
140
Chambers of Commerce
25
Municipalities

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Spend Friend Photos

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buy local & the multiplier effect

making a real difference.

The Big Spend is meant to be more than a symbolic gesture of hope.  It is a practical step we can take as part of a larger action plan for economic recovery in Canada. 

When we add the benefits of buying local to the positive impact of what economists call the “multiplier effect” we help create a snowball of growth for our communities, and our country as a whole.

buy local & the multiplier effect

making a real difference.

The Big Spend is meant to be more than a symbolic gesture of hope.  It is a practical step we can take as part of a larger action plan for economic recovery in Canada. 

When we add the economic benefits of buying local to the positive impact of what economists call the “multiplier effect” we can help create a snowball of growth for our communities, and our country as a whole.

buy local & the multiplier effect

making a real difference.

The Big Spend is meant to be more than a symbolic gesture of hope.  It is a practical step we can take as part of a larger action plan for economic recovery in Canada. 

When we add the economic benefits of buying local to the positive impact of what economists call the “multiplier effect” we can help create a snowball of growth for our communities, and our country as a whole.

why buy local

To put it simply, when you buy local more money stays in the community.

Research in Canada and the U.S. has shown that money spent with local business generates almost 5x more revenue than chain competitors.  For example, a study conducted in British Columbia found that, for every $100 spent with a BC local business, $63 was re-circulated back into the BC economy (vs $14 for multinational corporations). That means they re-circulate 4.6 times more revenue in the local economy.1

That doesn’t mean you should never shop at a chain or big box store.  In our age of globalized trade and interconnected supply chains, it’s not practical or possible to only shop local (even the term “local” can be confusing!)2  But, as Canadian politicians are urging in the wake of COVID-19, 3 making a point of supporting the small businesses in your community ensures money keeps circulating in your community, which promotes job growth, economic resiliency, and a stronger sense of belonging.

benefits of buying local4:

Job Creation

More Consumer Choice

Reduced Environmental Impact

Promotes Entrepreneurship

Keeps Money in the Community

Community Investment: Charitable Contributions

Sources:

1 The Economic Impact of Local Businesses: A Study on the Local Recirculation of Revenue by B.C. Retailers and Restaurants. LocoBC. Dec 2019. https://www.locobc.ca/cpages/resources

2 Irshad, Humaira.  Local Food: A Rural Opportunity. Government of Alberta.  July 2010. https://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$Department/deptdocs.nsf/all/csi13484/$FILE/Local-Food-A-Rural-Opp.pdf

3 Lapierre, Matthew. COVID-19’s economic impact: Premier urges Quebecers to buy local, announces $2.5 billion for businesses. CTV News. March 2020.  https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/covid-19-s-economic-impact-premier-urges-quebecers-to-buy-local-announces-2-5-billion-for-businesses-1.4860243?cache=%3Fot%3DAjaxLayout%3FautoPlay%3Dtrue

4 Robinson, Nandi and LaMore, Rex L. Why Buy Local? An Assessment of the Economic Advantages of Shopping at Locally Owned Businesses. 2013. Michigan State University Center for Community and Economic Development. https://ced.msu.edu/upload/reports/why%20buy%20local.pdf

The Multiplier effect

As one economist has said, money is like blood. It needs to keep moving around to keep the economy going.1

Research out of the University of Toronto has suggested that, if every household in Ontario spent $10 a week on local food, we would have an additional $2.4 billion in our local economy at the end of the year and create 10,000 new jobs.2  How?  Because of the snowball (multiplier) effect of money being recirculated in the local economy.  As an example of the multiplier effect working in a buy local effort, this U.S. study shows that “on average, 48 percent of each purchase at local independent businesses was recirculated locally, compared to less than 14 percent of purchases at chain stores.” 3

Certainly, there are a lot of other economic factors to consider.  Buying local and local recirculation of dollars will not suddenly solve our economic challenges.  But, in the multiplier effect, we see at least one economic principle that we can all leverage as our nation works on post COVID-19 recovery.

Sources:

1 Schwartz, Judith D.  Buying Local: How It Boosts the Economy.  Time Magazine. June 2009. http://content.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,1903632,00.html

2 The Multiplier Effect of Buying Local Food.  Sustain Ontario. July 2012. The Ontario Table. 2012. https://sustainontario.com/2012/07/04/multiplier-effect/#_ednref6

3 The Multiplier Effect of Local Independent Businesses. American Independent Business Alliance. 2015. https://www.amiba.net/resources/multiplier-effect/

big spend ideas

Here are a few suggestions to help you find and support a local small business in your area. 

Want more suggestions?  Visit the ShopSmallBiz.ca website from the Canadian Federation of Independent Business to find local shopping ideas in your area.